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Old 04-08-2013, 04:55 AM   #1
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I just bought a 2011 Hampton and unfortunately for me , I did not notice this before the deal. I purchased from a private owner who I believe did not know about this. It is hard to see unless the light is hitting it right but once you know its there it is visible. The large slide has what looks like swelling on the two bottom short walls exterior only. Kind of like the core is OSB under the aluminum skin and it is swelling with water . I can push on it but its not tight like I would expect with swollen wood. It is loose but does appear soft in some areas. No noticeable problems on the inside. Any one know the core of the slide panels ? Where do I go from here ?
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Old 04-08-2013, 09:09 AM   #2
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Not sure about the Hampton, but other CR models use aluminum studs for the slide-outs. There is no OSB in the sidewalls, just fiberglas insulation. Also, the end walls used to have filon skins just like the other exterior walls and therefore lauan plywood underneath. But CR changed to a different type of plastic w/o plywood (again, not sure about the 2011 Hampton, but that is how my Cruiser slide-outs are built). Slide-out floors are made of a type of OSB, that is because they are a single piece and longer than 8 ft.

If the end wall siding is fairly flexible, then you probably have the plastic skins and not filon skins, in which case, there is nothing to absorb water and swell up, except for the interior lauan skin. So, if you don't see any issue on the inside, then you may not have a problem. If you have windows in the end walls, they might leak, so check them carefully. But again if there is moisture in the walls, it should be more evident on the inside.

On edit; it sounds like you have aluminum siding, in which case, there is lauan plywood underneath to support the siding. However, the siding is usually attached only where studs are located, and on those short walls they will be either side of the window. So, how much flex there is depends on proximity to a stud. Regardless, if there is a leakage problem, it should be obvious on the inside.
Edited by: Dayle1
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Old 04-09-2013, 01:57 AM   #3
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Thanks, this is helpful. I have the optional gel coat exterior but the slides I believe are aluminum. I will have to look closer next time up.

I do have small windows in the ends. I wonder if I can pull off the interior panel and have a look as to what is going on . I would need to remove an overhead cabinet and then the interior panel . Not sure how those are held on . I cant see any pin holes from brad nails .



I do see the caulk seam running up where the side panel meets the long outer panel, is seperated. I will clean and recaulk these areas. I did look at my Wildwood and a couple other slide outs and they were all seperated in the same spot so I assume there is a better caulk system in place under neath and this is more of a secondary if that makes any sense.



Either way I am recaulking it. Is there a recommended caulk to use ? I have access to NP-1 which is a polyurethane and a good caulk.Edited by: Showtime
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Old 04-09-2013, 08:33 AM   #4
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Interior paneling is most likely attached to the aluminum studs with industrial construction adhesive. The window frames serve as clamps and the cabinet may be screwed into the studs. Any paneling removed will be ruined in the process, but you could just remove the bottom of the panel and then replace the damaged area with wainscot paneling up to chair height. A multifunction oscillating tool from Harbor Freight is excellent for cutting thru the thin paneling.
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Old 04-09-2013, 01:30 PM   #5
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Good idea . I am more concerned with mold starting to grow more than any structural damage. I can live with a distorted exterior panel. Mold , not so much.
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