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Old 10-18-2016, 03:09 PM   #1
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Antifreeze or Blow Lines

Hello all, for the last 3 years I have only blown my lines on our camper(Indiana). I haven't had any issues and hit all of the faucets/shower heads/etc.

Do you all use antifreeze or only blow the lines out? Or both?

Disadvantages of only blowing lines out?
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Old 10-18-2016, 03:31 PM   #2
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The main issue I see with blowing the lines is you don't get antifreeze into the P-traps or a little into the grey/black tanks to drain down to the gate valves. You could solve this by pouring some AF into the sinks, toilet, shower.

I use the antifreeze method.
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Old 10-18-2016, 06:13 PM   #3
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I use both methods, I was amazed at how much water was in the lines. Mainly use antifreeze in the traps and toilet.
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Old 10-18-2016, 08:27 PM   #4
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X2 on dual process. I do both. Incidentally I've had the dealership tell me twice now blowing out the lines voids the warranty. I could see if the pressure was too high it could damage the fittings, but I have a wall regulator on my compressor and run low <10 psi to bleed the lines.


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Old 10-18-2016, 09:06 PM   #5
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I blow the lines and put antifreeze in the drains.
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Old 10-18-2016, 09:23 PM   #6
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Blow out the lines, pump antifreeze, dump in traps and black and grey tanks. Put olive oil in toilet to keep rubber gasket soft and it will no evaporate.
If the rv has pex lines, they are good for over 120psi air pressure including the connectors.

Quote:
The pressure with water cannot exceed the following
pipe listings.
73.4F (23C) at 160 psi
180F (82.2C) at 100 psi
200F (93.3C) at 80 psi
Note:
The pressure with air must
not exceed 120 psi
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Old 10-19-2016, 09:29 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DavisK View Post
I blow the lines and put antifreeze in the drains.
X2, have done it this way on all of our trailers and have only had one issue of a shower head freezing and cracked but that was my fault. I forgot to make sure it was drained. I also pour antifreeze in the toilet bowl for the winter and haven't had any issues with dry seals.
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Old 10-21-2016, 07:39 PM   #8
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Thanks all...I'll continue to "do my thing". Olive oil is new to me, but makes sense. I'll be doing that this year.
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Old 10-22-2016, 07:48 AM   #9
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This my first unit and my first time winterizing it I did both and I put vaseline on my oring. I'll find out next spring if I did it right or not.
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Old 10-22-2016, 08:44 AM   #10
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If those pex lines and connectors are suppose to with stand 120#, I wonder why we are bothering with an inline pressure regulator?
If pex is any thing like regular plastic I think it might become brittle with age. (just my opinion)

For you guys that are putting some type of lubricant on the seals and blade in the toilet---I would not use something that is petroleum based. Rubber doesn't like that stuff.
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Old 10-22-2016, 01:01 PM   #11
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Use plumbers grease on your toilet seal, Vaseline is petroleum based & will eventually deteriorate your rubber seals. The olive oil.or cooking oil or some kind would be better than Vaseline.
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Old 10-22-2016, 03:52 PM   #12
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The average life span of PEX for plumbing purposes goes well over 50 years, it is durable since PEX will not easily obtain leaks or holes. It is able to withstand temperatures as high as 200 degrees F.
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Old 10-22-2016, 04:49 PM   #13
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The best way to winterize your unit is to head way south in the winter
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Old 10-25-2016, 08:31 PM   #14
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For the last ten years I have used a little different method for winterizing. After opening the low points and draining as much water as possible, I then run antifreeze through all of the lines. When I am sure they have been filled, I continue to run my pump with the taps open and drain back out 95 percent of the antifreeze. I use this to fill my traps and drains. This way the lines do not sit full of the pink stuff for the winter, but any low spots or sags in the lines do have antifreeze. In the spring it does not take very much flushing and we dont have that crappy taste in the water for long.
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Old 10-26-2016, 08:20 AM   #15
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I've been doing this for 10 years on my trailer with no issues:

1.Make sure the water heater is OFF! Drain water heater and leave drain plug out all winter. You can open the pressure relief valve so it flows faster, then close it.
2. Drain fresh water tank - leave drain valve open
3.Set the water heater lines to by-pass so the water heater is isolated
4.Open all faucets (hot and cold) and turn the pump on - let it tun until no water is coming out of any faucet - then turn the pump off.
5.Open your low point drains and drain the entire system then close the low point drains.
6. Close all faucets.
7. Connect air compressor to the city water connection. Set the compressor out pressure to 25 - 30 lbs. Turn compressor on and let it run until it shuts off. I use a 2 gallon compressor from Harbor Freight.
8. Start at the faucet farthest away from the city water inlet. Turn faucet on (hot and cold) and let run until no water is coming out. Turn the faucet off. Repeat this process for every faucet working from the farthest to the nearest to the city water connection. Do not forget the shower, the toilet, and the outside shower. Once only air is coming out of every faucet, disconnect the compressor. Open all faucets and leave them open for the winter.
9. Open your grey tank(s) and leave it/them open.
10. Pour antifreeze into traps until it is coming out of the sewer dump connection. Don't forget the shower.
11. Leave the black tank closed and dump about a half gallon of antifreeze down the toilet. This will protect the black dump valve. I always flush my black tank as the first part of winterizing until it is clean, but this is not necessary.
12. You are done! The entire process takes 1/2 hour to 1 hour not including the black tank flush.

In the spring, reverse the process to recharge the system. I only ever had to replace the outside shower faucet because I forgot to blow it out one winter.

Happy winterizing!
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