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Old 12-09-2012, 12:19 PM   #1
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Hello, I'm new here. I'm looking at buying an travel trailer to live in full-time in Texas, near Austin. I heard that the Crossroads RVs are well insulated. Does anyone have one and is living in it in a really hot place like Texas? Any other info and insights you can provide on the CrossRoads would be appreciated. Or if you know of other travel trailer RVs that would be better suited for this type of weather. Thanks!

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Old 12-09-2012, 01:07 PM   #2
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No matter what you get if it's much over 25-28' get one with 2 AC's or at least the capability to add one. In over 100 deg heat one ac just won't keep up.
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Old 12-09-2012, 10:14 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by avvidclif
No matter what you get if it's much over 25-28' get one with 2 AC's or at least the capability to add one. In over 100 deg heat one ac just won't keep up.
Thats true, I am in southwest Okla. My crossroads is 31' it starts strugglin at 95 up. I am going to put another unit on it for next year.
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Old 12-09-2012, 10:46 PM   #4
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I think you guys are responding to a spammer.

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Old 12-09-2012, 10:51 PM   #5
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When it comes to RVs, insulation is just part of the issue. Especially, for full-time use. Windows, doors, roof vents, etc represent a much larger percentage of the structure exterior than the usual house. Dual pane windows are about the only factory option to help, plus pillows for the roof vents. Slideout seals and other seals are a big source of air infiltration. Then there are other areas without insulation, the outside shower, water and electric hookups and especially the backside of the refrigerator cabinet since it is vented. Regarding summer heat, minimize direct sunlight with shade trees, slide out toppers and best case an RV port. Get a white rv, not a colored one, even a light color will be significantly hotter in direct sunlight.

Unless you go with a Mobile Suites, with 3-1/2 inch side walls, or a few other expensive units with thicker walls, most other units are pretty much the same. Don't get fooled by what the manufacturers list as insulation values. These are best case "calculated" numbers, there is only so much R rating than can be achieved with a 1-1/2 inch wall thickness.

My point is that in the typical RV, you won't be "insulated" from the heat or cold, but simply overpowering the heat gain or loss and paying high utility expenses. This is the long winded answer to why 2 A/C's may be critical for your comfort with a larger RV. OTOH, we spend lots of time in the Texas heat in our white, 33 ft. Cruiser with three slides and dual pane windows and get by with just a single 15k BTU A/C.
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Old 12-10-2012, 12:36 AM   #6
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I agree with Larry, especially on the white RV. Tests have been done showing the difference in surface temperature between white RV's and darker colored RV's can approach 40 degrees difference. That requires alot of extra cooling.
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Old 12-10-2012, 12:43 AM   #7
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Hi Old Farmer,
I am not a spammer. I am someone interested in the small house movement and downsizing to a very tiny house. but since most of those seem out of my financial reach (unless I build it myself which at 52 years of age I am not going to do) i'm now looking at RVs. I'm tired of MN winters, we just got blasted with a foot of snow, and I want out of here by next summer. sorry if i have done anything to make anyone believe i am a spammer. thanks!

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Old 12-10-2012, 12:53 AM   #8
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Hi Everyone,
Thanks for your quick replies to my questions. So it sounds like it doesn't matter what the R-value is on a camper because that's not a significant difference? If that's the case then I should just go with a travel trailer that I like and can afford? that would be great because right now every camper company that says they have great insulation tends to be way more expensive then the rest, even the used ones - which is what I would need to go with.


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Old 12-10-2012, 01:37 AM   #9
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We have used our Cruiser for 14 months over the past two years. All of this was at two places in North Texas and over two record hot summers. I can tell you without question that our one 15k a/c unit worked well. On the most brutal days the inside temperature did climb a bit but every night was very comfortable. We learned to use the awning and to keep the shades down. In addition we used reflective, insulated foil in the largest windows with western exposure. Our Cruiser was ordered with the optional insulation package and I am sure that helped. We also have 12 volt ceiling fans in two rooms. We used a desktop 110 volt fan at night.
The main thing, in addition to the a/c, is keeping the refrigerator cool. Use of the awning kept the back of the fridge out of direct sunlight. Once we figured all this out we stayed very comfortable.
BTW: Our rig is for sale. Look at the "Want to Buy a Crossroads " forum for the details.
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Old 12-10-2012, 05:19 AM   #10
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Something else to consider would be slide awnings. I don't have them (there are pro's and con's) but the few times I have camped in really hot weather the ceilings of the slides get pretty warm and may also make a difference how you fridge cools if it is in the slide.

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