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Old 10-20-2018, 01:10 PM   #1
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truck payload capacity - again

I know this is an old subject but would appreciate some of your thoughts.
I recently purchased a 2014 Silverado Duramax 2500HD, crew cab, regular box (short). The load capacity sticker on the door says it only has 2428 pounds of capacity. (you should look at the door sticker and not on online published data, duh). We are looking at upgrading to a new 5th wheel in the 33’ range. There are several manufacturers that have floor plans like we want and many have similar weight numbers, if you can believe the brochure numbers. Anyway, let’s use the Reflection model 337RLS for this example. The UVW is 10570 lbs and the hitch weight is 2090 lbs. We usually carry around 1000 lbs of water, propane, food, clothes, etc . aboard so using the 20% 5th wheel load to hitch ratio the numbers would look like this: (10570 dry + 1000 cargo=11570 X 20% = 2314 lbs hitch weight). Subtract the hitch weight from the truck avail. Carrying capacity and you get 114 lbs (2428-2314=114).
Now we go to truck bed cargo. People 350 lbs, hitch 150 lbs, misc. 100 lbs, fuel 240 lbs. (350 + 150+ 100 + 240=840) So, Now it looks like we are over our limit by 726 lbs. (840 lbs truck cargo – 114 lbs avail. Capacity = 726 ) or about 30% over.
Our old rig was a 2002 Silverado 2500HD Durmax and a 29’ 5th wheel and now that I crunch it’s numbers, after 14 years of towing , I realizing it was probably over around 450 pounds . It handled just fine.
It would seem that it would require a 3500 ( 1 ton) truck to legally handle just about any 5th wheel manufacturer model numbers 3xx or higher.
I would appreciate any feedback from those with experience in this realm.

Rick
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Old 10-20-2018, 03:22 PM   #2
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Perretty sure only dif between 2500 and 3500 is the uper overload springs. Get some timbrens for yours. I have a 2600 lb truck camper on my 2500 with timbrins and carries nicly.
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Old 10-20-2018, 04:54 PM   #3
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I truly believe the payload capacities of trucks are a scam. If you look online at the difference in ratings, it sometimes come down to a bump block. Nothing else changes as far as axle size, brakes, ....nothing. Look up a Body Builder Layout Book for your model truck. Every spec and dimension is in there. No reason the timbrens would not help you achieve your goal.
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Old 10-20-2018, 08:24 PM   #4
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From what I remember from past posts here on the forum, timbrens will help keep the truck level, but will not increase the payload capacity.
The biggest complaint was when the user had a small amount of extra weight in the bed of the truck (I don't remember how much weight) it created a harsh ride and a slapping. Larry Day put them on and he didn't like them because of that and took them out.
I would suggest the Roadmaster active suspension like Mark has. It's definitely more money, but heck, whats a little more money anyway?
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Old 10-20-2018, 08:27 PM   #5
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I agree with the padded payload stickers. I added some airbags, stiffer tires, brakes and have been 1,000lbs OVER the payload capacity. Door sticker on my truck is 1,680lbs and I had a yard bag of sand in the back which scaled out at 2,300lbs by itself then add me and my boy in the truck we were easily bumping 2600lbs of payload. Just aired the bags up to about 60lbs and leveled the truck right out and drove just fine. I still think these payload numbers a lot of times are based on the stock passenger rated tires at lower psi. If you look at that max payload # on your door sticker it will say “at X PSI” go look that up on a tire load chart for your tiresize/brand and I bet they will read real close to the same thing.
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Old 10-20-2018, 08:54 PM   #6
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So my point is if you look at my door sticker up in the top right my rear GAWR is 4,050lbs when using LT275/65/R18C tires at 40psi... just so happens that the max load for that tire is 2,535lbs, but thats at 50 PSI. So 2,535 divided by 50psi is 50.7lbs of carrying capacity per 1PSI. 50.7 x 40PSI = 2,028lbs carrying capacity per tire... i got 2 tires so that is 4,056lbs... or my rear GAWR, what a coincidence... much like everything else they have to put warning labels on things to protect the people who do not have the common sense to inflate the tires a little more when you haul something heavy. They keep these softer tires on these trucks to improve the ride quality and make them ride more like a car than a truck. So nauturally with soft tires you can’t haul as much on them. this is just my opinion though and can only tell you my real world experience with “overloading” my trucks sticker and everything was just fine.
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Old 10-28-2018, 08:08 PM   #7
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Tough to explain.

In the world of government no old law hardly ever goes off the books.

In the old days there were 1/2, 3/4, and 1 ton trucks. The dmv had licenses for them. Above 1/2 ton was licensed as a work/commercial vehicle. Not anymore. My wife when getting plates had to swear to the dmv she would not use the truck for commercial work. Even had to raise her hand.

Today the manufacturers make one heavy duty truck. Pay more and get some heavier stuff. Not motors or brakes. Mine is 4wd so has heavier stuff.

My sticker says 10,000 pounds. As mine has 18” wheels they are rated with the tires at 14,000 pounds for the capacity. The axles are rated for 12,500 pounds.

However there were no overload springs. My understanding is the differences in trucks are springs, the rear end and not much else. My Rear Springs were rated for about 10,000 I think.

I added Timbern overloads. Thus, my equipment is good for 12,500 likely. But, my dmv sticker says 10,000.

My factory hitch weight is #1850. My truck payload is the same as yours.

I suspect I am 800 pounds over the sticker on payload. But comfortable,I am below the trucks capacity. I am 2-3,000 under on tow weight.
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