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Old 03-28-2017, 04:30 PM   #1
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Murphys law, tire/wheel advice please

Hello, I just ordered new tires and I am trying to step up from a load range c to d. So I pull the wheels off because the tires will be in tomorrow and I see the wheel indicates max load 1820 which is what the c range is I was hoping to use the d range. What should I do, just not air it up above 50 psi? Will there be any benefit of the extra load rating? Should I use nitrogen or am I wasting more money? I have a trip next week and really don't want to buy new tires and wheels. Next time I will not learn, and probably make the same mistake again.

Thanks in advance.
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Old 03-28-2017, 04:40 PM   #2
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the 1820 is what the rim will hold ,weight wise. do not see why 10 lbs more will effect anything.
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Old 03-28-2017, 06:00 PM   #3
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Quote:
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the 1820 is what the rim will hold ,weight wise. do not see why 10 lbs more will effect anything.
I agree. Also don't wast you money on nitrogen.
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Old 03-28-2017, 06:08 PM   #4
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I agree. Also don't wast you money on nitrogen.
Thanks Harley and Papa- T, I knew I could rely on someone for advice and I don't feel too bad now.
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Old 03-28-2017, 07:23 PM   #5
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I've read or seen videos that nitrogen helps keep the tires cooler when traveling.

My neighbor is an airline mechanic. He says the nitrogen just helps prevent rust and the first time you have to add air because you aren't near a nitrogen pump or supplier, you lose the benefit of having the nitrogen to begin with.
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Old 03-28-2017, 08:19 PM   #6
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From Edmunds:
Quote:
"Is Nitrogen Worth It?
The air we breathe is made up of 78 percent nitrogen, 21 percent oxygen and a few other elements. To get the desired benefits for tires, nitrogen needs to be at least 93 percent pure, according to nitrogen service equipment providers quoted on Tirerack.com. So we're basically talking about adding an extra 15 percent of nitrogen and getting rid of as much oxygen as possible.
Based on cost, convenience and actual performance benefit, we don't think nitrogen is worth it. A much better use of your money would be to buy a good tire-pressure gauge and check your tires frequently. This is a good idea even if you have a tire-pressure monitoring system in your vehicle. The warning lights aren't required to come on until you have less than 25 percent of the recommended tire pressure. Having the correct tire pressure will get you many of the benefits of using nitrogen and will ensure that your tires last longer."
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Old 03-28-2017, 09:21 PM   #7
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That's interesting.

You have the same trailer I have. I installed D tires on those rims recently (2150 single, 1870 dual). The tire shop didn't say a thing.

So far so good, only about 200 miles on them.
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Old 03-28-2017, 10:10 PM   #8
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I knew there could be max psi ratings on rims, I didn't realize there were weight limits also, but that makes sense. Were there any psi limits on the rims?
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Old 03-29-2017, 05:48 AM   #9
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I knew there could be max psi ratings on rims, I didn't realize there were weight limits also, but that makes sense. Were there any psi limits on the rims?
I did not see any max psi ratings on the rims, there appeared to be some other markings but nothing that looked like max psi.
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Old 03-29-2017, 07:01 AM   #10
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I would say you will have no extra benefit from the higher load rating. Load inflation charts from say Maxxis show identical weight capacity with identical psi, so unless you use a higher psi than original you wI'll not increase capacity. Some people even question the validity of the charts. The higher rated tire has more rubber/cords and running at the same psi and carrying the same load , it will run hotter and therefore should suffer worse aging affects than the original tire. So you do need to run a higher psi and you should assume that the wheel rating implies a psi limit as well. Therefore you really need to upgrade the wheels. Otherwise you may have simply moved from the frying pan to the fire.

Finally you don't want to upgrade too far, tires are part of the suspension system, that is why they are not solid rubber. A tire that is too stiff for the actual weight puts greater shock forces on the bearings and other suspension components. You really need actual weight and then inflate tires to no more than 10 to 15 psi above based on inflation chart.
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